Non-Cash Gifts

Non-Cash Gifts

Non-cash gifts come in many forms, from stocks, cars and real estate, to furniture, building materials, clothing, food, paintings, and collectibles. Services you might perform for free for the University are not considered tax-deductible gifts, although any costs you accrue as part of the work done (such as paint for painting you do) are deductible.

  • For instructions for gifts of stocks and other securities, please click here.
  • For gifts of real estate, please contact Brad Mylett at bmylett@miu.edu or Eric Stakland at eric.stakland@miu.edu.

For other property donations, you may help us by filling out the form available below. It will be sent directly to us when you click the submit button. Or you can contact us at 641-472-1180, or giving@miu.edu. We will in turn contact you to coordinate our receiving and recording of your gift.

Although most non-cash gifts are welcome, it should be kept in mind that for various reasons MIU may not accept every gift offered. Therefore, it is necessary for MIU to evaluate gifts before final acceptance.

As is true of all donations, gifts of property must be recorded at the Development Office in order to be acknowledged as official donations to the University.

NOTE: If you have arranged with someone at the University where the donation will be utilized, that person will coordinate with us for the proper accounting of the gift.

Once we receive the gift we will send you a letter that can be used for tax purposes.

The Internal Revenue Service states that the more detailed the description of the gift, the more valid the thank you letter will be for tax purposes. The full description will be included in the letter we issue.

Extra items needed

In addition to filling out the form, if you can provide the following it will help with this process:

  • Digital photos of the item(s)
  • Photos of any receipts for the original purchase of the item
  • If the valuation of the gift is over $5000, the IRS requires an independent appraisal by an appraiser qualified to put a value on that type of property, so a digital copy of any such appraisal would be best

Also, a form 8283 is required to be filled out if any donated property is given a value of over $500. The form 8283 has a section to be filled out by an appraiser, which is required if any item or collection has a value of over $5000. (Instructions can be found at https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i8283)

The actual form can be downloaded here. You should be able to type into the form, have your appraiser add items (in Part IV), and then you can save it and send it along with any other extra items specified above to giving@miu.edu. Please specify “Non-Cash Gift” in the subject line of your email.

MIU does not provide tax, legal, or accounting advice. This material has been prepared for informational purposes only. You should consult your own tax, legal, or accounting advisors for the proper evaluation of your gift and the preparation of any tax forms.

 



Saipriya Gowrishankar—From Physician to Professor

Saipriya Gowrishankar—From Physician to Professor

August 8 2022 • ISSUE 634

Saipriya Gowrishankar

From Physician to Professor

Saipriya Gowrishankar grew up in India in a large family of doctors and, from a young age, aspired to become a physician. She attended medical school in India, then worked at a women’s health and fertility clinic in Chennai. Twenty years ago she moved to the United States with her physician husband.
 
In the US she has worked in various hospital systems on clinical trials and research projects and settled down in Cleveland, Ohio. While doing a volunteer project for her spiritual teacher, she was charged with the collection and digitization of Ayurvedic scriptures found all over the world.
 
“I was amazed by all the knowledge I found in my Ayurvedic scriptural research,” said Dr. Gowrishankar. “I realized Ayurveda bridges the gaps in my medical knowledge that I don’t have answers for.”
 
During her research, she also heard about Maharishi’s revival of the role of consciousness in Ayurveda. She learned the Transcendental Meditation® technique in 2018 and enrolled in the online MS in Maharishi AyurVeda® and Integrative Medicine program in 2019.
 
“The first thing that attracted me to MIU was Consciousness-Based education,” said Dr. Gowrishankar. “I fell in love with Transcendental Meditation, and every day my enthusiasm increased.”
 
She left her job to focus on her studies and, in her second year at MIU, was offered a teaching assistant position. Upon her graduation last December, she became a graduate instructor. Dr. Gowrishankar discovered she loved teaching, so she decided to earn a PhD in health and physiology at MIU.
 
Dr. Gowrishankar plans to launch an integrative medicine private practice and collaborate with colleagues at hospitals in the Cleveland area to further her research on Ayurveda. “My friends in integrative medicine are very open to the concepts of Ayurveda,” she said. “I want to bring Ayurveda to the scientific community.”
 
Dr. Gowrishankar has also immersed herself in studying Maharishi Vedic Science℠ and Maharishi Jyotish℠ and looks forward to taking the TM-Sidhi® course.

Ymane Lakhlif—Maharishi Ayurveda Student and Clinic Manager

Ymane Lakhlif—Maharishi Ayurveda Student and Clinic Manager

August 1 2022 • ISSUE 633

Ymane Lakhlif

Maharishi Ayurveda Student and Clinic Manager

MIU student Ymane Lakhlif grew up in New York City and competed in swimming throughout high school and college. She also earned a black belt in Tae Kwon Do at the age of nine.
 
Coming from a Moroccan heritage, she has always had an interest in natural health. In college she majored in biology and, after graduating, she combined her interests in sports and health to train as a fitness instructor. She began her career in a fitness club on Wall Street, where she quickly became one of the top trainers and the first woman to rise to a management position there.

With MIU students at the Doshi Center

Four years ago Ymane moved to Los Angeles and continued managing fitness studios. In 2020, when the COVID pandemic hit, all the studios shut down and she was without work. At the same time she developed a digestive health issue, which she was able to resolve with the help of traditional Chinese medicine. This spurred her to research Eastern medicine and eventually pursue a master’s degree in Maharishi AyurVeda® and Integrative Medicine at MIU.
 
“I wanted to continue my education with something substantial, not just a certificate,” said Ymane. “I appreciate the in-depth knowledge we are learning in class and I see myself doing this for a long time.”

During clinical practice with students and MIU faculty members Anita Mishra and Roxanna Medeiros

When she heard about the opening of MIU’s Navin and Pratima Doshi Center for Integrative Medicine in Los Angeles, she was eager to help. For the past year she has worked as operations manager of the clinic, as well as host of a weekly webinar featuring MIU’s faculty and guest experts. In addition, she oversees the renovations of the building along with her husband, who is the building’s manager.
 
The practice of the Transcendental Meditation® technique helps Ymane stay calm and focused with her busy schedule as a student and a manager. “Life can be very hectic and TM keeps me grounded,” she said.
 
In her free time, Ymane enjoys working out every day and maintaining a routine that centers on self-care.

Yick Oi Janet Ho—The Dao De Jing in Light of Maharishi Vedic Science

Yick Oi Janet Ho—The Dao De Jing in Light of Maharishi Vedic Science

July 25 2022 • ISSUE 632

Yick Oi Janet Ho

The Dao De Jing in Light of Maharishi Vedic Science

Yick Oi Janet Ho grew up in Hong Kong and has had an interest in language, literature, and Chinese philosophy from a young age. She earned a master’s degree in education and worked as a curriculum developer and coordinator for schools with special-needs students.
 
She learned the TM® and TM®-Sidhi programs in Hong Kong and became interested in studying the science of Maharishi’s technologies. She applied to the MA in Maharishi Vedic Science℠ program and enrolled in 2012. After graduating from the master’s program, she practiced reading the Vedic literature and began the coursework for the PhD program in Maharishi Vedic Science.
 
Dr. Ho then decided to pursue the application of Maharishi Vedic Science to a specific field and enrolled in the MBA program. “The first course I took was with Vicki Alexander Herriott, and I was so impressed by how she incorporated Maharishi Vedic Science into the material,” she said. “So I poured my whole heart into it and I enjoyed it very much.”

With classmates in the Maharishi Vedic Science Department in 2014

Dr. Ho completed her PhD in management, graduating this June with an Outstanding Student Award. In her doctoral dissertation she explored the principles of management in the Dao De Jing in light of Maharishi Vedic Science. Her current research interests include discovering consciousness factors in ancient Chinese philosophies.
 
“I experienced a transformation through Maharishi’s knowledge and technologies and from understanding the Dao De Jing based on Maharishi Vedic Science,” said Dr. Ho. “That transformation was the best gift; it gave me a deep sense of satisfaction.”

Receiving her doctorate in 2022

During the past 10 years Dr. Ho translated the official website of the Transcendental Meditation organization into Chinese and has published over 200 articles in Chinese on spirituality, philosophy, and life management. 
 
Dr. Ho now works as assistant professor of management, administrative director of the College of Business Administration, and director of the BA in Business Administration program for South Africa.